Current Projects

Black History Month in Inverclyde

#theafrowegian presents a series of events to inform, educate and entertain audiences in Inverclyde about Scots who had direct or indirect involvement with the Caribbean.

The approach will be multi-generational, inclusive and joyful – celebrating Inverclyde’s ‘Black History’ not being just for people of colour but for all.

New Perspectives on African Arts

theAfrowegian’s very own podcast series in which Jideofor Muotune listens to New Perspectives on African Art – starting with The Benin Bronzes.

Episode 1 is available now with more interviews and insights to follow shortly.

Upcoming Events

#theafrowegian presents a series of events to inform, educate and entertain audiences in Inverclyde about Scots who had direct or indirect involvement with the Caribbean.

The approach will be multi-generational, inclusive and joyful – celebrating Inverclyde’s ‘Black History’ not being just for people of colour but for all.

28th/29th/30th October – A Black Gaze on Galoshans

Animated performances of the Galoshans Halloween play projected onto the walls of the Arts Centre. Free event.

Saturday 22nd Oct – ‘Southern Fried’ – A celebratory Caribbean Cooking event.

In the fourth event the afrowegian is curating for Black History Month in Inverclyde, Jideofor is joined by academic and food historian Peggy Brunache.

Saturday 1st October  – What’s Watt gotta do with it?

Dr Stephen Mullen (in discussion with Jideofor Muotune) presents his research around James Watt; his father James Watt Senior; and his brother, John.

Catch us on Facebook

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A platform to encourage nuanced debate about race in Scottish culture

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1 month ago
Afrowegian

Academic and food historian Peggy Brunache leads a celebratory cooking event in which she and Jideofor Muotune cook and discuss what can be learned about the lives of slaves in the Caribbean through the food they cooked. They also look at this food's influence on our eating habits today. Audiences will have an opportunity to taste the food created at the event. ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago
Afrowegian

Academic and food historian Peggy Brunache leads a celebratory cooking event in which she and Jideofor Muotune cook and discuss what can be learned about the lives of slaves in the Caribbean through the food they cooked. They also look at this food's influence on our eating habits today. Audiences will have an opportunity to taste the food created at the event. ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago
Afrowegian

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2 months ago
Afrowegian

The Afrowegian presents a discussion on mixed race identity as part of Inverclyde Black History Month celebrations. ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago
Afrowegian

#theafrowegianpresents: Mixed race and ScottishOct 8, 11:30amThe Afrowegian presents a discussion on mixed race identity as part of Inverclyde Black History Month celebrations. ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago
Afrowegian

I'm black every day of the week but with Black History Month coming up I've some exciting content to share with you.
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5 months ago
Afrowegian

On April 26, 1851 Frederick Douglass changed the name of his first newspaper The North Star to Frederick Douglass’ Paper. This occurred following a merger of The North Star with the “Liberty Party Paper."

Photo 1: Front page of an issue of Frederick Douglass’ Newspaper (LOC)
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5 months ago
Afrowegian

Surprised to say the leastIle-Ife is the Oldest Kingdom in Nigeria, Not Bini

By Professor Omodion Imafidon

Ile-Ife Kingdom is the Oldest Kingdom in Nigeria and 2nd oldest Kingdom after Sahelian kingdom of Ghana in West Africa which was recorded from 11th century.
Some historical evidence prove that Ile-Ife was 4th Century while others said Ile-Ife has been in existence in the history of mankind, and the proof shouldn't be known to anyone or recorded.

Greek Historian, Herodotus, the father of History who lived from 4824 BC until 424 BC said about Ife: " According to history there were five ancient cities in Africa between 3000 and 1000 BC of which one was Ife".

According to BBC UK, The kingdom of Ife developed in the rainforest in the 600s. Its art and religion influenced the culture of Benin, which began in the 900s and reached the height of its power between the 1400s and the 1600s.https://www.bbc.co.uk/bit.../topics/zpvckqt/articles/z883gk7

Between 700 and 1600, there were three great empires in the centre of West Africa: Ancient Ghana, Mali and Songhai.They all grew immensely rich by trading in gold. One of the last great kingdoms was Asante. It was founded around 1700. The Asante people were famous for their work in gold.

The Bini Kingdom that was later destroyed by the British was formed in 1170CE. Bini Kingdom was a neighbouring Kingdom to Ile-Ife Kingdom, and this is why in the history of bini today, the Ruler that established Obaship in bini was from Ile-Ife (Olumense 1971) etc.

The largest ethnic in West Africa sources from Ile-Ife ranging from Nigeria, Benin Republic, Ghana, Gambia etc. The root of some of these ancient tribes in West African countries were traced to Ile-Ife.

Father of history Herodotus, put in his record that the Europeans only attacked Bini kingdom due to disagreement, it is not that there are no other neighbouring kingdoms. If there were no neighbouring kingdom, then the prince of Ile-Ife wont be invited by bini people to rule over their land.

Ile-Ife remains where it is today in a place now called Western Nigeria, but we can see majority of tribes even outside Nigeria tracing their roots to ile-ife. History reveals that Ile-Ife has been existing before historian started putting it in record. Ile-Ife wasn't created by any ruler or king. It was a forest before it was established by the inhabitant and records were taken.

Prof. Omodion Imafidon
Nigeria, West Africa.
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5 months ago
Afrowegian

This is my mantra #CitizenHistorian ... See MoreSee Less

5 months ago
Afrowegian

IconMarcus Mosiah Garvey one of the baddest Africans to ever live, joined the ancestors today 82 years ago. Today we reflect on his life as a revolutionary.

The honorable was a descendant of Maroons and began his revolutionary work at a very young age. Between the years 1910 to 1913, whether it for work or for broadening his political thought, Garvey in his travels between South America, The Caribbean and Europe observed that the “Afrikan race nowhere found a safe haven”. Undoubtedly Garvey is the father of Pan Africanism and one of our greatest leaders of the twentieth century. Garvey would go on to organize six million Africans around the world under the need for self-determination, racial pride, separatism and Pan Africanism.

The most important thing that Garvey left his people, was hope. Africa is a source of ingenuity to her people. Africa will be free and dwells our glory. We must not only speak of Garvey and his work but organize around his political thought.

“Up You Mighty Race! You Can Accomplish What You Will!”
- Marcus Garvey
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